Just like daddy! Sonko’s daughter Saumu flaunts huge stack of money!

Saumu Mbuvi is one of the scions of wealth. The daughter of Nairobi governor Mike Sonko is very popular among the youth for her dream lifestyle that her father has been able to provide for her.

Saumu Mbuvi with her father Mike Sonko
Saumu Mbuvi with her father Mike Sonko

This week the rich kid flaunted bundles of cash on Friday evening via social media. The first born daughter of the controversial Nairobi Governor posted a photo of herself sitting in an office with one section of the desk entirely packed with money.

Saumu Mbuvi posing
Saumu Mbuvi posing

She also had a clear message to her followers stating that she knew her worth and was never afraid of flying solo.

I know what I bring to the table, so trust me when I say I am not afraid to eat alone.

The reactions to her post were hilarious with many Kenyans asking for a donation from her. One of them even asked her to pay for his diploma course in purchasing and supply course at the Nairobi Institute of Business Studies.

Some of the other comments were different for her action. Some of those comments are below;

PetersonM14; She’s battling immaturity!
Joseph Odhiambo; It’s a shame bringing up a kid this way, especially a leader should be more worried about this?? Is this Sonko’s salary or county money or God loves them more than all of us?
Joanem Moshyrem; Kanesa nirushue kakitu.

Read here for more

My body my choice-Passaris releases video showing off her legs

Nairobi Woman Representative Esther Passaris is unfazed by trolls who have attacked her in the past week.

On Tuesday, Passaris sought help from Twitter users to find culprits behind a fake photo of her juxtaposed next to Governor Mike Sonko in a bed.

She was able to track down the culprits behind the photo and rewarded the Kenyan who helped her with Sh10,000.

Passaris and Sonko have been at loggerheads since Madaraka Day celebrations on June 1 when the governor accused her of constantly demanding county cash from him.

Sonko going to Madaraka day with his offical attire 3
Sonko with Passaris at the Madaraka Day celebrations

The Woman Rep denied the allegations and warned Sonko and any other person against maligning her name.

She invited the DCI to investigate any misuse of county cash.

During Madaraka Day, Sonko went ahead to say Passaris had incessantly been calling him, adding that she was not “my wife” for him to respond to her calls all the time.

On Saturday, Passaris took to Twitter and told off naysayers in a tweet, “Almost 55 and still a queen at rock n’ roll. This is for the trolls on Twitter who can’t get enough of my legs. Can we move on now? #MyDressMyChoice.”

She continued, “Do they not know that beneath every dress or suit is a NAKED being? Above every NAKED being is a dress or suit. The difference is in spread and texture based on culture and season. #It’sMyBody #ItsMyChoice #ItsMyDress.”

Several leaders have stood by Passaris, condemning the negative statements said against her.

Amnesty International executive director Irungu Houghton said women should be respected.

He tweeted, “We must see this in the context of a growing movement of courageous women who are asserting that they, and only they, have a right to control their own sexuality, finances, transact business and govern. The sooner we all wake up to this the better.”

Martha Karua said Sonko’s behaviour is acceptable.

She tweeted, “@EstherPassaris ought to report @MikeSonko unethical behavior to @EACCKenya for action.” The video is below;

The Star

The importance of fatherhood in this day and age – Statistics

Fatherhood is a very important role in the raising of children. Single parenthood, especially that of single women has become the norm the last 40 years.

This has made many wonder if fathers are needed anymore as many single mothers have been shouldering the role for the past few years? According to statistics they are. Check out the list below;

-Individuals whose fathers showed more involvement in their lives early on tend to attain higher levels of education.

-Growing up without a father appears to be associated with greater likelihood of incarceration later in life.

-Fathers’ religiosity is linked to higher quality of parent-child relationships.

-Fathers’ engagement in their children’s activities was linked to higher academic performance.

-Children living with fathers in the home tend to fare better on cognitive achievement and behavioral outcomes.

-Adolescents living in intact families tend to report closer relationships with their fathers.

-Among urban fathers, those who frequently attend religious services tend to be more engaged with their children.

-Close relationships between adolescents and their fathers are positively associated with adolescents’ psychological well-being.

-Adolescents with more involved fathers tend to exhibit lower levels of behavioral problems.

-Adolescents who report having more positive relationships with their fathers are less likely to engage in delinquency.

-Adolescents who report having more positive relationships with their fathers are less likely to abuse substances.

-Among adolescent girls, those who have a strong relationship with their fathers are less likely to report experiencing depression.

-Close father-adolescent bonds protect against the negative influence of peer drug use.

-Adolescent girls who have a close relationship with their fathers are more likely to delay sexual activity.

-Adolescent girls whose fathers were present during their childhood are less likely to become pregnant.

-Adolescent males who report a close relationship with their fathers are more likely to anticipate having a stable marriage in the future.

-Men who become fathers outside of marriage are more likely to be poor.

-Fathers of intact families spend, on average, more time with their children.

-Children raised in intact families by happily married parents tend to be more religious in adulthood.

-Children raised in intact families are more likely to have stable and healthy romantic relationships as adults.

-Intact families are more likely to provide a safe home for children.

-Adolescent girls who have never lived apart from their parents are less likely to report sexual abuse than those who have.

-Girls who experienced a parental separation during childhood are more likely to engage in early sexual activity.

-Among teenage boys, those from intact families with frequent religious attendance average the fewest sexual partners.

-Children in father-absent homes are almost four times more likely to be poor.

Read here for more

3 people dead and scores injured in road accident along Wamunyu-Machakos road

Three people died and scores others injured, following a grisly road accident along Wamunyu-Machakos road.

Mwala Deputy OCPD Ronald Kirui said two people died on the spot while the third one died while receiving treatment at the Masii level four hospital.

The Saturday incident occurred after a 14-seater public service vehicle headed to Machakos is said to have rolled several times two kilometres from Wamunyu town after a tyre burst.

Most of those at the hospital sustained multiple fractures following the accident.

Read here for more

Kenyan s3x addicts reveal struggle

S3x addiction is sometimes looked at as an inconsequential matter, but for two Kenyans, it almost destroyed their lives.

Two victims have spoken up about the impact it has had on their lives.

“At its worst, even having sex seven times a day wasn’t enough,” Agnes Mwende says.

Mwende, a mother-of-three, says her sexual compulsion took over her life in 2018 and ruined her relationship.

In the beginning, she thought she just enjoyed sex with her partner, but sex became the only thing she thought of.

“It was literally the first thing I thought about when I woke up, I just couldn’t get it off my mind,” said the 37-year-old, from Kitui county.

She says whenever she told her friends they would joke about it.

“My friends laughed at my condition and because I am a Kamba lady they said the tribe is known for loving sex.”

“I took it as a normal thing.”

Mwende’s condition caused serious problems in her relationship. Though her partner enjoyed the attention at first, it became insurmountable for the couple.

“At first he was fine with it but towards the end, he couldn’t understand it at all. After a few months, he started to raise questions about why and where it was coming from.”

Her husband accused her of having an affair – “he thought I must have been feeling guilty about it and that’s why I wanted sex with him.”

ESCAPE TO MASTURBATION

She turned to masturbation.

“It was giving me the instant hit and five minutes later I wanted it again.”

She says she became a loner and stayed in the house.

In November 2018, Mwende “needed a break” from the relationship and went to stay with her mother.

“When I left, I told my partner I needed to get better. He let me go, then the relationship broke down very quickly after that.

“I was under the care of a psychiatrist at the time – she kept saying she would alter my medication but she never said there were any support groups or anything.”

She was diagnosed with depression in 2012 after the birth of her third child. She said after it intensified in 2018 she changed jobs, split up with her partner and moved to Nairobi.

“I made many lifestyle changes in order to get over the depression and the addiction and for me, that has worked,” she said.

MULTIPLE PARTNERS

Mark, whose name has been changed to protect his identity, said his compulsion led him to cheat on his wife with “hundreds” of s3x workers, leaving him with guilt.

“When you are in full-blown addiction you are obsessed with thinking about it – from the moment you wake up to the moment you go to sleep.

“It was a horrible, gross experience – there is nothing sexy about it. When you wake up in the morning with a dose of chlamydia, it is not sexy.

“It is damaging and life-destroying.”

Mark, who is in his 50s, estimates he paid hundreds of thousands a month for sex over several years, even building relationships with some of the s3x workers he saw.

“What started with one affair at work led to another – but unlike most office affairs which may stem from one partner being unhappily married, mine was an addiction which I had to feed each day.

“You have one affair and then you want another and another one.

“I soon realised that the quickest and most convenient way for me to feed my addiction was to pay for it. I would be seeing escorts, sex workers, three or four times per week.

“It is just like being an alcoholic, it’s a cycle that builds up in your mind – you feel a high from thinking about how it might happen and then you act it out in the way you planned.

“Then when it’s over you feel remorseful, you say you’re never going to do it again.”

Mark stopped leading his “horrendous double life” when his wife found an email and confronted him.

He sought help from psychologists and says he has abstained from extra-marital sex for several years.

“For people who are in this situation, I just want them to know that there is a way out and you can break the cycle.”

Addiction Counselor Faith Mwangangi says there are many ways in which sex addiction can manifest.

“Some addicts need to have random hookups with strangers, while others use pornography to meet their needs.”

She says some are addicted to self-pleasure or a particular fetish, while other sex addicts crave the voyeuristic attention of others.

Mwangangi says behind all the varying behaviours of sex addiction is the psychology of the addict.

“S3x addicts lack a clear and unambiguous view of the role sex plays in their lives and in their intimate relationships.”

She says sex addicts feel a sense of release or freedom when engaging in their fantasy worlds.

The Star

Celebrating some of the best fathers in Kenya

Being a father is not easy especially in an age when the role is undermined and caricatured to no end. But there are still those who are forging forward with this role that is very important.

Some of those are in Kenya and they show what great fatherhood. The criteria are very simple. That they are present and proving for their kids. They are below;

Bishop Allan Kiuna

The founder of Jubilee Christian Church and his wife Kathy have been blessed with 3 children, Vanessa, Stephanie, and Jeremy, their “miracle” baby. “Jeremy was born prematurely at six months, weighing just 1.1 kilograms.

Allan Kiuna
Allan Kiuna

Kiuna has been such a good father and he recently showed that when his son Jeremy graduated from his school where he got a standing ovation.

William Ruto

The deputy president of Kenya has been blessed with two kids and recently celebrated his son Nick Ruto becoming a member of the bar.

William Ruto with his kids
William Ruto with his kids

Nameless 

The singer and his wife Wahu have been blessed with two daughters over the course of their dozen-plus year marriage.

Nameless and his kids
Nameless and his kids

Kidum

The Burundian singer has been blessed with 7 kids with his most recent addition coming this past month. The toddler is called Kajiado, whom he had with his current wife Josephine.

Kidum-holding-his-new-born
Kidum-holding-his-new-born

Uhuru Kenyatta

The 4th president of Kenya has been blessed with 3 kids with his wife, Margaret. Despite the high pre3ssure that his office has, Uhuru is an ever-present paternal presence in his kid’s lives.

The Kenyatta family
The Kenyatta family

Anthony Gichuru

Julie Gichuru’s husband has been in the lives of his 4 kids. The two have been together for close to 20 years and in that period lost one child.

Julie Gichuru and Anthony Gichuru
Julie Gichuru and her husband Anthony with their family

Read here for more

Obesity DOES cause heart disease-Study shows

After decades of research showing the impossibly close link between obesity and heart problems, a Swedish study has finally proven what we’ve long suspected: Excess weight does cause heart disease.

Obesity alone – without other risk factors like high cholesterol, inactivity and diabetes – raises a person’s risks of heart disease by nearly a third, previous research has shown.

At last, the Karolinska Institute researchers used a method called Mendelian randomization prove that high BMI is a direct cause of heart disease.

And that meas that a third of the world’s population – the proportion of humans that are now overweight or obese – could be on a path toward the number one cause of death without lifestyle changes and medical interventions.
The first study of its kind was based on hundreds of thousands of Britons and a revolutionary statistical technique called Mendelian randomization.

This enabled the Swedish team to use genetic variants as a tool to show the causal relationship between cardiovascular disease and BMI (body mass index).

In particular, they discovered as BMI and fat mass increased so did the risk of many more than half a dozen conditions – especially aortic stenosis.

This where the valve controlling the flow of blood from the heart to the body’s largest blood vessel, the aorta, narrows and fails to open fully.

If left untreated it can lead to serious problems – and even death.Professor Susanna Larsson, of the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, said: ‘The causal association between BMI and fat mass and several heart and blood vessel diseases, in particular aortic valve stenosis, was unknown.

‘Using Mendelian randomization we found that higher BMI and fat mass are associated with an increased risk of aortic valve stenosis and most other cardiovascular diseases, suggesting that excess body fat is a cause of cardiovascular disease.’

The ‘fat but fit’ theory suggests a bulging waistline is not harmful as long as other metabolic factors like blood pressure and glucose are within recommended levels.

But evidence is growing that this is wrong – an may be sending out the wrong message to millions of people.

Using data from 367,703 men and women aged 40 to 69 they identified 96 gene mutations linked to BMI and body fat mass to estimate their effect on 14 cardiovascular diseases.

The participants were from the UK Biobank, which holds biomedical information on half a million people. They were all of white British descent and aged 40 to 69.

Those with variants predicting higher BMI were at increased risk of aortic valve stenosis – as well as a host of other life threatening conditions.

These included heart failure, deep vein thrombosis, high blood pressure, peripheral artery disease, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation and pulmonary embolism.

For every genetically-predicted one unit rise in BMI, the increased risk ranged from six percent for pulmonary embolism to 13 percent for aortic valve stenosis.Above a BMI that is considered ‘healthy’ (20-25), this corresponded to a weight gain of around six and a half pounds (nearly three kilos) for someone who is 5ft 7in tall.

The study, published in the European Heart Journal, also found cardiovascular disease risk rose in tandem with mutations predicting increases in fat mass.

Again, the connection with aortic stenosis was most pronounced – with a risk increase of 46 percent.

The damaged valve means less blood leaves the heart and it has to work harder to pump enough blood out to circulate round the body.

Blood can back up in other parts of the heart and sometimes the lungs. This can lead to shortness of breath, tiredness, fainting, chest pain and an irregular heart beat.

This was followed by stroke, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, peripheral artery disease, deep vein thrombosis, high blood pressure and coronary artery disease.

These gene variants can all predispose people to be more likely to put on weight, said the researchers.

But they stressed the most important factors implicated in the development of cardiovascular disease are diet and physical activity.

Prof Larsson said: ‘Our genes can make us somewhat more predisposed to gain body weight but lifestyle factors, such as overeating and lack of physical activity, are the major determinants of overweight.

‘A healthy diet is the cornerstone of cardiovascular disease prevention, and how much we eat should be limited to the amount of energy required to maintain a healthy body weight,’ of 18.5 to 24.9.

‘People who are predisposed to a higher BMI may need to work a bit harder to maintain a healthy weight.’ Mendelian randomisation uses mutations known to be associated with potential risk factors, such as BMI and body fat, as indirect indicators or ‘proxies’.

This enables researchers to discover whether the risk factor is the cause of the disease – rather than the other way around.

It also reduces bias in results because variants are determined at conception and cannot be affected by subsequent external or environmental factors, or by the development of disease.

Two years ago scientists who conducted a 20-year study of 3.5 million Britons by the University of Birmingham found those who were obese but who had no initial signs of heart disease, diabetes or high cholesterol were not protected in later life.

Last year a study of 300,000 middle aged Britons by the University of Glasgow found the risk of illnesses such as heart attack and stroke increased in every measurement the fatter a person was.

The findings go against previous studies that suggest carrying too much weight is not necessarily a sign of ill health.

Having a BMI of 25 to 29.9 is considered overweight, and 30 or above obese

Above a BMI that is considered ‘healthy’ (20-25), this corresponded to a weight gain of around six and a half pounds (nearly three kilos) for someone who is 5ft 7in tall.

The study, published in the European Heart Journal, also found cardiovascular disease risk rose in tandem with mutations predicting increases in fat mass.

Again, the connection with aortic stenosis was most pronounced – with a risk increase of 46 percent.

The damaged valve means less blood leaves the heart and it has to work harder to pump enough blood out to circulate round the body.

Blood can back up in other parts of the heart and sometimes the lungs. This can lead to shortness of breath, tiredness, fainting, chest pain and an irregular heart beat.

This was followed by stroke, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, peripheral artery disease, deep vein thrombosis, high blood pressure and coronary artery disease.

These gene variants can all predispose people to be more likely to put on weight, said the researchers.

But they stressed the most important factors implicated in the development of cardiovascular disease are diet and physical activity.

Prof Larsson said: ‘Our genes can make us somewhat more predisposed to gain body weight but lifestyle factors, such as overeating and lack of physical activity, are the major determinants of overweight.

‘A healthy diet is the cornerstone of cardiovascular disease prevention, and how much we eat should be limited to the amount of energy required to maintain a healthy body weight,’ of 18.5 to 24.9.

‘People who are predisposed to a higher BMI may need to work a bit harder to maintain a healthy weight.’ Mendelian randomisation uses mutations known to be associated with potential risk factors, such as BMI and body fat, as indirect indicators or ‘proxies’.

This enables researchers to discover whether the risk factor is the cause of the disease – rather than the other way around.

It also reduces bias in results because variants are determined at conception and cannot be affected by subsequent external or environmental factors, or by the development of disease.

Two years ago scientists who conducted a 20-year study of 3.5 million Britons by the University of Birmingham found those who were obese but who had no initial signs of heart disease, diabetes or high cholesterol were not protected in later life.

Last year a study of 300,000 middle aged Britons by the University of Glasgow found the risk of illnesses such as heart attack and stroke increased in every measurement the fatter a person was.

The findings go against previous studies that suggest carrying too much weight is not necessarily a sign of ill health.

Having a BMI of 25 to 29.9 is considered overweight, and 30 or above obese.

Daily Mail

Polisi watafuta mwili ya Muhubiri aliyejitia kitanzi huko Matayos

Maafisa wa polisi kwa ushirikiano na wananchi wangali wanausaka mwili wa mwanaume mmoja anayeaminika kuwa muhubiri ambaye alijirusha kighafla kwenye mto sio kwenye daraja linalo unganisha barabara kuu ya busia-kisumu huku akiacha nyuma bibilia na shilingi 40.

Wananachi wanasema kuwa mwanaume huyo alikuwa amebebwa kwa pikipiki kutoka soko la Matayos kuelekea mjini Busia ambapo aliruka kutoka kwa pikipiki hiyo na kukimbia hadi kwa daraja hilo na kujirusha ndani ya maji.

Hatua iliyo mchochea kutekeleza kitendo hicho imesalia kuwa kitendawili.

Soma mengine hapa

DNA results finally solve mystery of Kakamega twins

DNA results released by pathologists at Lancet Kenya have revealed that Sharon Mathias and Melon Lutenyo are biological twins.

The results revealed Sharon and Melon share identical DNA profiles and Rosemary Onyango is their mother.

“With the 23 allelic loci tested show 100 per cent perfect match, which is consistent with the two being biologically identical twins,” a statement from Lancet read.

Further, Angeline Matias and Wilson Maruti had a 99.99 per cent probability of being Melvin Imbaya’s parents.

A summary of the DNA profiling test results reveal DNA was taken from Sharon Mitekwa, Melon Lutenyo, Melvis Imbaya, Rosemary Khaveleli Onyango, Angeline Omina Matias and Wilson Lutah Maruti.

Sharon and Melon travelled from Kitale to Nairobi on Friday to meet with doctors and pathologists from the facility.

“The DNA profile analysis on the samples was completed early May but the reports were withheld until when the girls and the respective families were available to recover the results,” Dr Ahmed Kalebi said.

Kalebi also revealed that a single DNA test costs between Sh10,000 and Sh 20,000.

Collectively, it would have cost the family about Sh120,000 to conduct the tests but Lancet gave them a discount and they got help from well-wishers.

Sharon, Melon and Melvin were born at Kakamega hospital in August 1995 where it is alleged they were switched.

Rosemary Onyango had earlier been informed during clinic visits that she expected triplets. When she asked the nurses after delivery, they said the doctors might have been wrong about triplets.

She was handed Melon and Melvin who she raised as twins while Sharon was raised by Angeline Amina in Kangemi.

The two girls connected in December and Melon agreed to visit Sharon in Nairobi during April holidays.

The families have however said the results would not tear apart their family. The girls who are form four candidates are expected back to school on Monday.

“These girls still love each other and will remain as sisters even after these results… we want our children to go back to school and do their final examinations,” Matias said.

Sharon studies at Shikoti Girls High School and Melon at Kongoni Secondary School, both in Kakamega County, while Mevis studies at Kimosong’ Girls High School in Trans Nzoia County.

The Star

Budget your trip: List of Africa’s most cheapest countries to live in 2019