Henry Wanyoike’s Hope for the Future Run to take place on 8th June

The 13th Edition of the Henry Wanyoike Hope for the Future Run has been scheduled to take place in Kikuyu on 8th June 2019.

This is in addition to providing security and ambulances for the event whose target for the year is to raise KES 10 million, in kind and cash that will be used to distribute 200 white canes for visually impaired people across all 47 counties.

“This year our goal is to distribute white canes to enhance mobility for visually impaired people. This will have a positive impact on their lives because they will be able to move around on their own in their places of work, business and school,” said Henry Wanyoike, world record holder and founder Henry Wanyoike Foundation.

“Last year we raised KES 5 million which we used for various projects; we distributed White canes and Wheelchairs, and supported a nursery school run by Henry Wanyoike Foundation for over 70 vulnerable children, and we planted over 3,000 trees in Kiambu County,” said Mr. Wanyoike.

This year’s categories will be the; 9kms for seniors and juniors, wheelchair races as well 3.5 km for veterans and children.

“As part of our commitment to offer a platform for athletes, we have been supporting the Henry Wanyoike Hope for the Future Run since inception. We are proud to be part of this noble race once again and we are happy that the funds raised will be used to ensure that as many visually impaired people are empowered,” said Sylvia Mulinge, Chief Customer Officer, Safaricom.

An exciting line-up of athletes is expected at the run including last year’s winners; Rhonzas Lokitam, Kamau Wangui, Robert Ndiwa and Ruth Karanja, Judy Cherotich and Esther Waweru

8,000 participants are expected to attend the run.

Celebs who have openly talked about having parents/siblings with disability

Disability is frowned upon in the African setting but these celebrities have broken the stigmatization by talking about it in public.

Hard as it may be, they have opened about having disabled children or siblings some even parents, narrating how the journey has been.

  1. Anne Ngugi

Media personality Anne Ngugi has a daughter who is battling hydrocephalus. Speaking about it she says

“She understands she is different from other kids. When we go out to mentor people, she is able to express herself very well. As a mother, my dream is to see her stand strong on her own, even when I am not there, and never allow anyone to point fingers at her, telling her she is different. Raising a child with special needs has not been easy for Anne, but she does not complain about it.”

Anne Ngugi with her daughter and Lulu Hassan
Anne Ngugi with her daughter and Lulu Hassan

Police officer Joash Ombati recovers 400k stolen from a man in broad daylight in a daring attack in Westlands

She adds that

“Sometimes you go to places with her and that is when I feel the weight that she is different from others but for her, Angel has developed a thick skin and, therefore, she copes. I have always accepted because I know there is always a reason.

You have to accept the fact that your child is special and start looking for solutions, as well as try so hard to love that child because no one will love your child more than you.”

2. Yvonne Okwara

Yvonne recently lost her brother who was deafblind almost all his life. In a previous interview she opened up about it saying that

“In the 60s, while expectant, my mother contracted German Measles. It has no symptoms. By the time she was giving birth to her first born son, there were complications. Mental retardation, and deafblindness started to set in.

 She tried everything, no door was unknocked, multiple surgeries, consultations. She talked to every doctor in the country. All of them, including, the professors, told her they had travelled far and wide and had NEVER seen anyone like my brother.

That he would not live beyond his 5th birthday. Or his 10th. Nor his 12th. Albert Okwara is still here! 50 years later! What a journey it has been.”

yvonne-okwara

Adding that

“Friends have fallen along the way, those that could make the choice did so and exited our lives. Called it a curse. To the entire community! I won’t name names but he knows himself!

The world of disability is a lonely one! The road has been lined with tears, pain, dashed hopes. But it has also had wonderful lessons that have made me who I am today! Let me explain, Albert is deafblind. He does not see, speak or hear.”

3. Emmy Kosgei

Female artiste Emmy Kosgei is another Kenyan celebrity who has openly talked about having a family member battling disability.

Emmy’s dad is bound to a wheel chair after his limbs were affected by polio years ago. In an earlier post, the artiste expressed her amazement at the fact that her mum over looked her dad’s disability .

She says that

“My mum is my inspiration, I have grown to see my mum achieve much having brought us up having been married to my dad who is physically challenged.

I am still amazed at how she was able to overlook my dad’s physical disabilities , and marry him  even with the pressure from the society and his family on what she had seen in such a man.”

Adding that

“She  married him and she has stood by him even as he studied at the university, we were also in school but she has been there through it all”

Deep details of Jacque Maribe’s life in the cell

4. Henry Wanyoike

He is known for his love for athletics, having ran in so many races but it has not been easy for him.

Speaking about the day he lost his sight, Henry recollects how in March 1995 while he was having breakfast, numbness struck him.

One day in March 1995, Henry was having breakfast when a piece of ugali he was holding suddenly fell off his left hand, followed by crippling numbness on the same hand.

“I was confused and could only manage a stammer. I was scared.”

At the nearby Thogoto Mission Hospital, doctors could not find anything wrong with Henry. Doctors at the Kenyatta National Hospital later discovered that Henry had suffered a stroke.
henry-wanyoike-650x350
That was the beginning of his ordeal. One day, Henry woke up to his mother’s loud shouts. She was wondering why he had overslept, forgetting to milk the cows. Henry remembers:

“We argued with mum. I tried to tell her it was still dark while she insisted that the sun was up. I reached for the light switch but couldn’t see anything and concluded there was a power blackout. Mum thought I was just being lazy.”

Soon, his mother realized that her son was not putting on a show and they went back to Thogoto Hospital.

Several tests revealed that he had lost his sight and that nothing could be done to reverse the condition. At 21, Henry had become blind.

“I got into a depression,” says Henry.

5. DJ Pinye
In Daddy Owen’s music video ‘Mbona’ in collabo with Denno, Pinye talks about having a brother who is epileptic.
 The next time you want to give up just think about what the people above and a million others go through everyday, and be encouraged.